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Rate of Alzheimer’s disease will more than DOUBLE in America by 2060

The rate of Alzheimer’s disease in America is expected to double by 2060 to 15 million, a new study revealed. That is up from this year’s rate of 6.08 million Americans that have the debilitating brain disease.

This study – the first of its kind – estimated that 47 million Americans have early signs of Alzheimer’s disease or mild cognitive impairment. Continue reading

A Recipe for Alzheimer’s Disease

What causes Alzheimer’s Disease (AD)? I recently read an article written by Stephanie Seneff, a Senior Research Scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. I know from my years at Harvard that MIT does not employ dummies. So it’s worthwhile reading her “Recipe for Developing AD.” Continue reading

Your Memory Is An Amazing Thing

Here’s How Your Memory Works

Memory is an astonishingly powerful thing. It allows you instantly call to mind events, emotions, songs, smells, first loves, first dates, and a thousand other things. In some senses, it is a mysterious thing. How can our brains call such powerful and vivid images to mind years after the fact?

While memory isn’t a physical object that can be studied like a plant or species of animal, we can analyze the cycle of remembering. Continue reading

Quackery: A Brief History Of The Worst Ways To Cure Everything

From doctors giving women orgasms to cure their ‘hysteria’ to cocaine to sooth toothache and tobacco enemas to revive drowning victims…

It was not unusual for Victorian women to be given orgasms by their doctors – in a bid to cure them of their ‘hysteria’, a common problem said to affect three in four.

Cocaine was also once used to soothe tooth pain – and was famously an ingredient in Coca Cola – while tobacco enemas were a form of first aid given to revive drowning victims in the 18th century. Continue reading

Glen Campbell… Himself ’til the End!

August 9, 2017: Late yesterday we heard of the death of musician, singer and performer, Glen Campbell. Of course I was well aware of his music and career – the good, the bad and the sometimes ugly. I did not go out of my way to listen to him often, yet many years ago I had a LIVE multi-hour concert which he had performed at the Royal Albert Hall in England – and yes – I did enjoy it.

Over the past few years we would hear little updates regarding the progress of his Alzheimers Disease, but what I was not aware of until this very day – is that his final tour was an amazing family journey – as well as a life lesson to all those who have either suffered, or have witnessed the suffering and ultimate death of friends or loved ones. Continue reading

Green-tea catechins found to protect the brain from cognitive decline

An active ingredient in green tea called epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) was found to inhibit memory impairment, brain insulin resistance, and obesity, a new study concluded. According to a study that was published online in The FASEB Journal, EGCG, the most abundant catechin and bioactive component in green tea, can contribute to addressing neuroinflammation issues and brain insulin resistance that is triggered by a high-fat, high-fructose diet (HFFD). Continue reading

Hearing loss, diminished verbal fluency and hospitalizations can signal cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease

Researchers have identified hearing loss, verbal fluency and hospitalization as new factors that can provide clues about cognitive health and aid in early detection of Alzheimer’s and other dementias.

Spotting signs of cognitive decline is especially important, experts say, because drug treatments and prevention strategies are most effective at the earliest stages of dementia. Continue reading

Cure for Alzheimer’s?

Scientists discover two genes that cause the disease – and how to target them

A groundbreaking study has found two new genes which could be linked to Alzheimer’s.

Until now, these genes were seen as protectors, since they are part of the brain’s immune system.

However, scientists at Cardiff University have demonstrated that they can also create fertile ground for the neurodegenerative disease. Continue reading

Orange a day cuts the risk of dementia by a quarter

How tangy fruits could be a powerful weapon against condition

Eating an orange a day could slash the risk of dementia, a major study shows.

Daily intake of any citrus fruits such as oranges, grapefruits, lemons or limes can cut the chances of developing the incurable brain condition by almost a quarter, it suggests.

The findings, by a team of scientists at Tohoku University in Japan, suggest that tangy fruits could be a powerful weapon against a disease that is emerging as a modern day epidemic. Continue reading

Extra-virgin olive oil prevents dementia by prompting the brain to clear out harmful debris

The oil is a key ingredient of the Mediterranean diet, which is associated with a variety of health benefits, including a lower dementia risk.

Now scientists have discovered that olive oil reduces the risk of dementia by prompting the brain to clear out harmful debris.

Regularly eating olive oil can protect your memory and your ability to learn new things as you age, according to the new study.

The discovery has been hailed as an ‘exciting’ breakthrough in the battle against Alzheimer’s disease. Continue reading

Adults with ADHD are more than THREE TIMES as likely to develop dementia

Adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are more than three times as likely to develop dementia as their peers, new research reveals.

Researchers studying 600 adults with ADHD over a 10-year period found they are 3.4 times more likely to be diagnosed with dementia than those without the behavioural disorder.

The scientists said it is unclear why people with ADHD appear to be more prone to dementia. Continue reading

A ‘Sniff of Rosemary’ could boost the memory

The key to a better memory could be right under your nose.

The smell of rosemary boosts our ability to recall past events and remember what to do in the future, research claims.

It is thought a compound that gives the herb its distinctive smell –1,8-cineole – aids a brain chemical which is the key to memory.

The same brain chemistry is targeted by Alzheimer’s medicines, and researcher Dr Mark Moss, head of psychology at Northumbria University, says the plant has a ‘drug-like effect’. Continue reading

Getting lost could be the first sign of Alzheimer’s…

It may show up decades before disease is diagnosed, say researchers

Getting lost could be an early sign that Alzheimer’s disease might affect you later in life, according to new research.

The Prevent project, based at Edinburgh University, aims to understand early biological and clinical markers to identify risks in young people and to help prevent Alzheimer’s and dementia.

The study, funded by the Alzheimer’s Society, suggests that poor navigational skills could be linked to the disease.

‘Alzheimer’s is considered to be a disease of memory but we now think from our early work that the difficulty people are really having – at least to begin with – is not to do with declining memories but to do with their declining ability to visualise the location of objects or themselves,’ said Karen Ritchie, one of the researchers, according to The Guardian. Continue reading

Daily dose of cannabis extract could reverse brain’s decline in old age, study suggests

Regular low doses of THC dramatically boosted memory and learning in older mice, say scientists, who plan a clinical trial in humans later this year

Older mice given THC improved so much that their performance in tests matched those of healthy drug-free young mice – and benefits lasted for weeks after the infusions ended.

Researchers have come up with an unusual proposal to slow, or even reverse, the cognitive decline that comes with old age: small, daily doses of cannabis extract.

The idea emerged from tests on mice which found that regular, low doses of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) – the main psychoactive ingredient in cannabis – impaired memory and learning in young animals, but boosted the performance of old ones. Continue reading

‘Silent seizures’ are the first sign of Alzheimer’s – and could help doctors catch the disease years in advance

Researchers have dubbed the episodes ‘silent seizures’ because they don’t cause convulsions and aren’t detected by normal brain scans

Doctors have detected ‘silent seizures’ that mark the onset of Alzheimer’s disease in a breakthrough study that could lead to new treatments for millions of patients.

The devastating illness begins with seizures deep in the main memory structure of the brain, known as the hippocampal region, specialized brain scans reveal.

The phenomenon was first spotted in mouse models 10 years ago. Continue reading

Sleeping 9 Hours Doubles Risk Of Dementia

If you want to avoid getting a form of dementia in your later years, you should consider cutting down on beauty sleep, a new study finds.

Researchers at Boston University Medical Center examined data from the Framingham Heart Study, an established and ongoing project. They found that those who slept nine hours or more a night had double the risk of developing dementia than those who slept less than nine hours. Continue reading

Eat to Beat Dementia

How purple food, turmeric and even coffee could help boost your memory

Research into the links between what we eat and our risk of developing dementia is still new, but some foods do have the potential to reduce our risk of developing the condition

Ten years ago, I was contacted by a family whose elderly mum was fading away before their eyes. This wonderful lady had dementia, which was causing her difficulties with swallowing that made it hard for her to eat.

The family had been advised to puree her dinners in a blender, but, understandably, their mum didn’t want to eat the grey mush this produced.

I’ve been a dietitian for 25 years (and a trained Cordon Bleu chef), with a client list that includes top sports people, actors and singers, so I knew there was a better way to give her the nourishment she needed. Continue reading

Aluminum linked directly to early onset of Alzheimer’s disease

Aluminum is everywhere: it contaminates vaccines, it’s in a variety of medications, baby products, cosmetics, and it’s even in the food you eat. And like several other metals, it isn’t really all that great for the human brain (or the rest of the body).

Even the CDC’s Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) notes that aluminum can elicit negative effects in the musculoskeletal, neurological, and respiratory systems. This is especially worrisome because some research indicates that aluminum is capable of building up in bodily tissues, which would greatly increase its potential to cause harm. Continue reading

Are mushrooms the anti-Alzheimer’s superfood?

Scientists think so!

The bioactive compounds found in mushrooms could play a role in reducing or delaying the development of age-related neurodegenerative diseases, a new study claims

Mushrooms could be the food that protects you from Alzheimer’s disease, a new study claims.

Scientists have found that mushrooms contain contain bioactive compounds that could play a role in reducing or delaying the development of neurodegeneration. Continue reading

Concussions could cause Alzheimer’s

Researchers find clearest ever link between mild head injuries and the tragic brain disease

Concussions drastically increase one’s risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease, new research shows.

Scans performed on wounded war veterans have revealed the clearest evidence to date that mild head injuries wear down the defenses of brain regions vulnerable to the disease.

Until now, doctors considered severe traumatic brain injury a key risk factor for developing neurodegenerative diseases such as late-onset Alzheimer’s. Continue reading

Odds of early death in Alzheimer’s patients nearly doubles after taking antipsychotic drugs

Alzheimer’s patients who take antipsychotic drugs have a significantly increased risk of dying early compared to those who don’t, new research out of Finland has found. An in-depth analysis of nearly 58,000 people diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease between 2005 and 2011 found that those who take popular antipsychotics like Abilify (aripiprazole) or Risperdeal (risperidone) face as much as a 60 percent increased risk of premature death — and this risk is even higher when Alzheimer’s patients take two or more antipsychotics. Continue reading

The Inner World of Alzheimer’s, It’s Meaning and Purpose

The fact that there is a greater incidence today of Alzheimer’s disease than in previous centuries has not gone unnoticed by some observers who seek to account for its increased presence among the aging, one that occurs at great personal cost and with grave consequences for families and loved ones. A spiritual view of the inner world of Alzheimer’s disease casts light on its meaning and purpose, and the inner reorganization taking place as outer functioning diminishes. Continue reading

Aluminum in vaccines linked to Alzheimer’s and other neurological conditions

British researchers claim they have confirmed that aluminum plays a strong role in the onset of Alzheimer’s disease.

Dementia and Alzheimer’s disease are now the leading causes of death around the world, superseding heart disease. More than 5 million persons in the U.S., where it is the sixth leading cause of death, have been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, according to the Alzheimer’s Association; in the U.K., 850,000 people are living with the brain disorder.

By mid century, the number of Alzheimer’s suffers could range from 14 to 16 million. Continue reading

Sugar Linked to Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease

It is hard to comprehend the degree of damage perpetrated by sugar, one of the most wildly popular and ubiquitous ingredients in the typical Western diet. Consumption of sugar has already been identified as a leading risk factor in obesity, tooth decay, fatty liver disease, insulin resistance leading to diabetes and the metabolic syndrome, cancer, and heart disease. It has been likened to any other addictive substance in its effects on the brain and its manipulation of dopamine and serotonin levels. Sugar has also been linked to an increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Continue reading

The Inner World of Alzheimer’s, It’s Meaning and Purpose

The fact that there is a greater incidence today of Alzheimer’s disease than in previous centuries has not gone unnoticed by some observers who seek to account for its increased presence among the aging, one that occurs at great personal cost and with grave consequences for families and loved ones. A spiritual view of the inner world of Alzheimer’s disease casts light on its meaning and purpose, and the inner reorganization taking place as outer functioning diminishes.

The fact that there is a greater incidence today of Alzheimer’s disease than in previous centuries has not gone unnoticed by some observers who seek to account for its increased presence among the aging, one that occurs at great personal cost and with grave consequences for families and loved ones. Continue reading

Aluminium DOES cause Alzheimer’s

Expert says new findings confirm the metal plays a role in the devastating brain disease

There has been a strong link between human exposure to aluminium and the incidence of Alzheimer’s disease for half a century or more. However, without definite proof, there is still no consensus in the scientific community about the role of this known neurotoxin in this devastating brain disease.

The latest research from my group, published in the Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology, makes this link even more compelling. In my view, the findings are unequivocal in their confirmation of a role for aluminium in some if not all Alzheimer’s disease. Continue reading

Did You Just Forget, or Is It Something More Serious?

The risk for dementia is 10 percent in people 65 years or older and nears 50 percent by the age of 85, experts say. Credit China Photos/Getty Images

The risk for dementia is 10 percent in people 65 years or older and nears 50 percent by the age of 85, experts say. Credit China Photos/Getty Images

Have you called your daughter by your wife’s name or your son by his brother’s name? Have you misplaced your car keys or forgotten where you parked at the mall?

If you worry these might be signs of significant memory loss or the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease, which causes a slow deterioration in memory and reasoning skills, fear not, experts said.

Not all memory lapses are created equal. Continue reading